Somerset County Historical Society has Christmas tour, Teackle Mansion reception on Saturday, Dec. 2

PRINCESS ANNE — The Somerset County Historical Society celebrates Olde Princess Anne Days with two separate events this Saturday, Dec., 2: a Christmas House Tour and a Candlelight Reception at historic Teackle Mansion

 

The tour of several Princess Anne properties is 1 to 5 p.m. and visitors will receive special access to centuries-old public buildings and private homes. This is a rare opportunity to peek inside 15 historic properties, beautifully-decorated for the holidays.

 

This year, the tour includes:

  • Thomas Brittingham House, c. 1817
  • Collins House, c. 1910
  • Colonel George Handy House, c. 1805
  • Crisfield House, c. 1852
  • Dashiell-Williams House, c. 1905
  • Grey Eagle, c. 1857
  • Linden Hill, c. 1835
  • Manokin Presbyterian, c. 1765
  • McAllen House
  • Judge Henry J. Nelson House
  • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, c. 1767
  • Samuel H. Sudler House
  • Teackle Gatehouse, c. 1805
  • Teackle Mansion, c. 1802
  • Washington Inn & Tavern, c. 1797

 

Tickets: $15/person. Available at Somerset Choice Station Antiques, 11731 Somerset Avenue, Princess Anne, MD. Call 410.651.2238 for more information.

 

Two of the private homes on the tour are the Colonel George Handy House and the Thomas Brittingham House, both located on Beechwood Street in Princess Anne.

 

The Colonel George Handy House (1805) is new to the tour and currently owned by Dr. Michael Lane, of UMES’ Richard A. Henson Honors Program, and Mr. Nicholas Donchak. Located just north of the Thomas Brittingham House, this Federal period construction where Handy, Clerk of Court for Somerset County, wife Elisabeth, and family resided, features exposed brick fire walls and superior woodwork. In the original kitchen, an imposing fireplace, hewn beams and a plaque dedicated to the lives of the slaves in service to the Handy family can be seen.

 

In the late 1980s, the Colonel George Handy House was the home of John V. Dennis, noted conservationist, ornithologist and author, who died in this home on December 1, 2002. Mr. Dennis authored A Complete Guide to Bird Feeding in 1975 and, according to the New York Times, is credited with increasing the public’s enthusiasm for bird feeding. To attract birds to his home, Mr. Dennis thickly planted the grounds of the Colonel George Handy House with trees and shrubs, many unusual, and collected from around the world. Lane describes his holiday décor as an eclectic showcase ranging from classical to kitsch, with twelve themed trees, five live greenery and berry-bedecked mantles, a snow-people room, and a collection of more than 150 Santas.

 

 

The Thomas Brittingham House is also located on Beechwood Street, south of the Colonel George Handy House. Also known as the John H. Stewart House, it was built in 1817. The house was rescued from demolition by the Somerset County Historical Trust in 1992. Current owners John & Penny Nicholson, purchased the house in 1994 and after much research the home was restored in stages by Mr. Nicholson to its Federal style/. Mr.& Mrs. Nicholson have lived in the house since 2002.

 

From 6 to 9 p.m. the Historical Society opens Teackle Mansion for a lite fare of gourmet good by the Washington Inn & Tavern. Tickets for this are $45 per person and available at Somerset Choice Station Antiques, 11731 Somerset Avenue, call 410-651-2238.

 

Enjoy cocktails & savory hors d’oeuvres in the drawing room, locally-harvested, fresh-shucked oysters in the kitchen, and dinner with friends. The evening’s activities will also include a silent auction featuring spectacular gift baskets and unique Somerset County experiences.

 

All proceeds benefit the Somerset County Historical Society.

 

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